IS NOW THE RIGHT TIME TO SELL YOUR BUSINESS?

IS NOW THE RIGHT TIME TO SELL YOUR BUSINESS?

Neil Jones is the head of the Corporate and Commercial team at Ansons Solicitors

Despite the massive impact the lockdown has had on the UK economy, many businesses have continued trading, although not all are recognised as essential services.

Push bike sales have enjoyed a 200 percent uptick, but the new car market dropped by 97 percent in April (with just 4,321 registrations), highlighting the struggle faced by some sectors.

Many business owners will be considering selling up, but now is not the best time and snap decisions should be avoided.

Buyers know the current situation offers bargains. Sellers should be careful when dealing with issues like due diligence, warranties, indemnities and price adjustment mechanisms, to ensure they do not accept much poorer terms of sale than they normally would.

The coronavirus crisis remains fluid and may cause buyers, after the purchase price and other terms have been agreed, to try to revisit terms and alter matters in their favour – a situation to be avoided.

READ: MANAGING PROPERTY IN A PANDEMIC: KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

Remember, the buyer is purchasing the long-term viability and potential of the business, which must be reflected in the deal’s terms.

If the deal was already in the process of being negotiated before the current crisis, then the buyer might wish to revise the terms to modify the price adjustment mechanisms.

Sellers can take steps to protect themselves, like asking for more payments upfront to avoid the risk of deferred payments, as the current volatility could impact the buyer as much as it does the seller.

Any seller would need to go through the disclosure process again to mitigate the risk of any claims, and revisit any relevant warranties in light of the pandemic, in case they need amending or qualifying.

SIMPLE STEPS TO SUCCESS

Selling a business is a series of clearly defined steps, including securing the position of workers, minimising personal tax liabilities and deciding what expert advice is needed.

This could involve a corporate finance adviser, a tax accountant and a corporate lawyer, ideally experienced in the sector in which the business being sold operates. There’s no substitute for experience when identifying areas of risk.

When taking on an expert, a clear division of responsibilities and a fee structure should be agreed in writing so the seller can create the best possible picture of their business to maximise the sale price.

READ: HOW TO SELL A BUSINESS

This can involve tidying up loose ends, selling under-used property or equipment, positioning major purchases or implementing strict stock management and credit control measures to maximise working capital and create a stable, longer-term financial pattern.

Currently, sellers are more likely to be offered a valuation that maximises the buyer’s chances of securing the business as cheaply as possible. The seller must evaluate the status of the buyer as carefully as they would normally to understand if they can fund the purchase.

It may be tempting to rush due diligence checks in a ‘buyers’ market’, but this would be a mistake by the seller and the kind of panicked response the buyer, who may be highly geared themselves or only have vague financial promises, will hope for.

If part of the purchase payment is to be deferred, what guarantees are in place with regard to those payments? Do they reflect the reality of the current pandemic- related market conditions?

Additionally, if payments are linked to future business performance, will the seller have ongoing influence on the business? Do the figures reflect the impact of coronavirus?

During the lockdown and the economic uncertainty that will follow, buyers will place increased emphasis on due diligence, more particularly on aspects such as insurance, supply chain risks, business continuity and employee health and safety policies.

As a seller, it’s best to be transparent, which not only demonstrates good faith, but also helps protect against any future claims if any information was not fully disclosed.

Sellers should rely on their expert advisors to fully interrogate the details of any offer, which these advisors will view dispassionately – it’s what the seller needs and what the bargain-hunting buyer fears.

When it comes to deferred pricing mechanisms or earnouts, the seller must ensure they are fully covered with regard to the pandemic’s impact on their business.

The buyer may predict a business slowdown over the next six months and attempt to structure a deal based around continued pre-coronavirus earnings during that period, which may result in that earnout being unachievable.

The seller needs to be clear about what a realistic prospect for future trading is (allied to their own ability to influence that trading post-sale) with clauses in the sales agreement reflecting that reality.

Selling might be the only option for some business owners but they must exercise caution. The pandemic has created market conditions where speculators feel they can grab bargains, but sellers can still structure any agreement to ensure the business they have worked hard to build is not undervalued.

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MANAGING PROPERTY IN A PANDEMIC: KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

MANAGING PROPERTY IN A PANDEMIC: KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

Adam Pike is a Senior Associate Solicitor and member of the Ansons dispute resolution team

The coronavirus story changes by the day. After the initial shock of the lockdown, people are analysing the support offered to help the UK economy recover from this difficult period.

The headline measure for landlords and tenants was contained in the Coronavirus Act 2020, which came into force on 26th March.

READ: CORONAVIRUS AND THE AFTERMARKET

Currently in place until 30 June, this act introduced a moratorium on forfeiture of commercial leases due to non-payment of rent in a bid to deal with the issue of commercial rent arrears. However, there is strong evidence to suggest the measures will be extended past the original June deadline.

Many commercial tenants have praised the move, saying that it offers them breathing space to take stock and come to terms with the changes that have been made.

However, the measures were not as extensive as some tenants will have hoped. Rent is still payable during this period of moratorium, and landlords can rely on other enforcement measures to recover payment.

UNEXPECTED CONSEQUENCES

In the rush to protect tenants, landlords have been placed in a difficult position for which they could never have prepared. For many, a large part of their rental income has vanished in the space of a month, and measures like the Coronavirus Act 2020 have limited the number of available remedies.

Commercial landlords, at time of writing, have not been granted the kind of loan repayment holiday offered to other sectors of the business world. There is a significant chance that large numbers of landlords will face insolvency in the next few months and beyond.

The questions to consider are what insolvency means for the landlord and for any tenants who thus far have managed to keep their business operating.

READ: IGA LAUNCHES COVID-19 COMPLIANCE SCHEME FOR GARAGES

EFFECTS OF INSOLVENCY

In the first instance most landlords will probably opt for a Creditor’s Voluntary Arrangement (CVA) rather than full-scale liquidation. This will take the form of an agreement between the landlord and any creditors and can be entered into as long as 75% of those creditors agree.

Any tenant of a landlord taking this course of action will not be involved in the process itself (being a debtor rather than creditor) and will only discover it has happened after the event.

The impact a landlord CVA might have on a tenant is difficult to predict, but under the supervision of an insolvency practitioner, it is likely that the attitude of the landlord towards their tenant will harden somewhat in respect to lease obligations being met in full and on time.

As such, the kind of flexibility needed for the negotiations between a landlord and tenant in the current climate are likely to be absent once a CVA has been put in place.

If a landlord enters into administration rather than opting for a CVA, the impact on a landlord and tenant is likely to be reduced. As the administration will be attempting to rescue the landlord company, the administrator will work closely with existing management, which should ensure that existing lines of communication continue to operate as before.

Administration will usually cover the whole of the landlord’s business and all properties let. There are more complex circumstances however, which can arise from a landlord holding a number of profitable properties, and some which are not. Loss-making properties could pull the otherwise profitable business into insolvency, a risk which is intensified during the current coronavirus crisis.

The solution is often pre-pack administration, which sees the profitable element of the business sold off to form a new company, and the loss-making aspects becoming part of a CVA.

A tenant of the profit-making element of the business will take the new company as their landlord, which will often involve working with the management and admin team of the original company.

The new landlord company will not be able to vary any of the obligations under the existing lease. If, however, there is new management as part of the new landlord company, they may well take a more hard-line approach to negotiating lease renewals, rent reviews, end of term dilapidations, etc. with a view of maximising income for the new company.

READ: THE GUARDIANS OF THE ARCHES

COMMUNICATION IS KEY

However the scenario unfolds, it is in the interests of both tenants and landlords to keep lines of communication open and remain transparent throughout.

Beyond the pandemic, it is to nobody’s advantage if either landlords or tenants find themselves being forced out of business rather than being able to weather this storm.

If you have any concerns relating to insolvency, or a landlord and tenant dispute, it is important to consult an experienced team of lawyers who can help you achieve the best possible outcome.

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BRIDGESTONE TO RESUME EUROPEAN TYRE PRODUCTION

BRIDGESTONE TO RESUME EUROPEAN TYRE PRODUCTION

Bridgestone EMIA is today resuming production at its European manufacturing plants in Bari (Italy) and Lanklaar (Belgium). The Béthune (France) plant will reopen tomorrow, 21 April 2020.

READ: AVON TYRES PLANS 300 REDUNDANCIES

This move comes following an announcement on 14 April that production in all Bridgestone plants located in Spain (Burgos, Bilbao and Puente San Miguel) and Russia (Ulyanovsk) had recommenced.  The Indian and South African plants remain closed for the time being.

READ: CORONAVIRUS: MORE THAN 60 PERCENT OF GARAGES HAVE SHUT

Bridgestone plants were originally closed in reaction to the widespread drop in demand for tyre products, as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. However, with the need for tyres now beginning to rise again, the business has made the decision to resume production in order to ensure adequate supply.

The Japanese brand has, however, suspended operations at eight tyre factories in Japan in light of lower-than-usual global demand. The plants will be closed from 29 April until 8 May, in an extension of a previously planned three-day closure for Japan’s Golden Week national holiday.

Posted in Factor & Supplier News, Garage News, Latest News, NewsComments (0)

CORONAVIRUS: MORE THAN 60 PERCENT OF GARAGES HAVE SHUT

CORONAVIRUS: MORE THAN 60 PERCENT OF GARAGES HAVE SHUT

More than 60 percent of garages in the UK have closed their doors during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a poll.

The survey of suppliers, motor factors and garages was conducted to highlight the current state of the automotive aftermarket, as it continues to respond to the pandemic.

While 60 percent of garages in the UK have closed, many that have temporarily closed are still offering emergency work to customers and keyworkers.

READ: CORONAVIRUS: FACTORS TO REMAIN OPEN

The survey, carried out by marketing and PR agency Impression, found the main reasons for garages closing were a significant drop in business caused by social distancing measures and the decision to extend the MOT from 30 March by six months. Other respondents noted practical reasons such as childcare and the inability to source parts as motor factors had also closed.

On the question of what business support they were aware of during this time, 88 percent of garages had heard of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (furloughing).

When asked what type of online training they would like to take part in, 73 percent of garages were interested in electric and hybrid training. This was followed by an interest in product training.

READ: CORONAVIRUS AND THE AFTERMARKET

The number of motor factors closing was smaller, currently 25 percent. Whether open or partially open, motor factors were running at 50 percent and below capacity. Interestingly, the motor factors that had initially closed had done so because of pressure from the public.

On to suppliers and manufacturer businesses, 67 percent were fully open, eight percent closed and 25 percent partially open.

Demand for product had reduced dramatically, in some cases by up to 85 percent. Business support, product and sales training were key for suppliers during this time, the survey of around 500 businesses revealed.

Mark Field, Impression director, said: “It’s important to see where we are as an industry and it’s clear that the MOT extension has had severe repercussions throughout the supply chain. Close communication is key as the market is changing on an almost daily basis with businesses reopening and garages receiving much needed support in the way of grants. We also seeing many acts of inspiration, innovation and overall kindness, which will define our industry for generations to come.”

Posted in Factor & Supplier News, Garage News, Latest News, NewsComments (2)

PROMO: QUALITY COUNTS WHEN IT COMES TO THE CRUNCH

PROMO: QUALITY COUNTS WHEN IT COMES TO THE CRUNCH

PROMOTIONAL ARTICLE ON BEHALF OF BM CATALYSTS

BM Catalysts Commercial Director Mark Blinston discusses why quality always wins in the battle against cost

Reassuringly Good

At BM Catalysts we pride ourselves on our reputation for quality. Years of dedication to doing things the right way, as well as continuously investing in people, processes and production techniques, means that we’re now in a market-leading position despite the seemingly endless uncertainty around the UK’s exit from the EU.

Whilst recent times have seen other businesses looking at ways to consolidate or even scale back their operations, our long-term strategy of continuous investment and improvement sees us in a unique position where we can continue serving our customers the high levels of quality and service they have come to expect from BM Catalysts, even in uncertain times.

BM Catalysts Commercial Director Mark Blinston

Increasing Regulation

The automotive industry itself is continually looking to tighten its grip on quality standards. The Department for Transport is focusing more scrutiny on the quality of parts, and by default the processes, of our sector, primarily through the work of the Market Surveillance Unit of the DVSA. This includes taking a closer look at manufacturers and distributors producing and supplying non-compliant (or even sub-standard) parts. Legislation leaves little room for interpretation when it comes to culpability. Whether a part is being made, sold or fitted, we all have some responsibility in ensuring that the right part is supplied for the right vehicle, and that parts conform to both regulatory standards, as well as those required for the vehicle itself.

Assuring Quality

If a good cataloguing system is being used properly, it’s now virtually impossible to order or supply the wrong part. However, factors are often still using the practice of cross-referencing to try to find cheaper alternatives, and it is here that the risk of error creeps in. Type approval cannot be simplified to similar parts from different manufacturers being direct alternatives. Just because a BM part and a competitor’s part can both be used on one vehicle, for example, it doesn’t mean that they can both be used on all of the vehicles that the BM part is type approved for. Homologation is much more specific than that and should be taken seriously. You have to ask yourself, if the alternative to one manufacturer’s part is not listed in the cataloguing system but seemingly has a cross reference, why is this?

Automated plasma cutters at work

The Answer to the Quality Question

We’ve built our reputation for exceeding expectations in all areas, including ensuring that we are compliant when it comes to legislative requirements. We’re proud to consider ourselves a supplier that our partners can rely on to deliver the right product at the right time, with a stringent focus and commitment to quality being at the forefront of everything we do.

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EMISSION PARTS PRODUCER LOSES COMPLIANCE CASE

EMISSION PARTS PRODUCER LOSES COMPLIANCE CASE

A case described as a ‘landmark’ has been won by DVSA against a Hampshire-based emission parts manufacturer.

The ruling, described as the first of its kind, against EEC (European Exhaust and Catalyst Ltd) took place at Portsmouth Magistrates Court and concluded on Monday 28 October, resulted in a criminal conviction for the company and a £3,000 fine.

The court also ordered the company to pay costs totalling £10,460 and a statutory surcharge of £170.

READ: KLARIUS DIRECTORS FACE COURT

The parts were diesel particulate filters and were supplied for Euro 5 vehicles when they were only approved for Euro 4 vehicles and did not have a label on the physical product containing the words: ‘ILLEGAL TO SUPPLY FOR VEHICLES APPROVED TO EC REGULATION 715/2007’.

DVSA’s Head of Vehicle Engineering, Neil Barlow said: “Motorists expect that replacement parts available on the aftermarket meet the right specifications for their car. This is the first successful prosecution of its kind. We hope it sends a clear message to other parts manufacturers and distributers that they must sell their products in line with the law or face prosecution.”

The offences relate to the supply of parts that were not approved for the vehicles for which they were supplied for and without the required legal markings.

The judge at the hearing commented that this was a very difficult case for sentencing as it was the first ever prosecution of its kind, but he wanted to bring home the seriousness of offences of this nature in light of emissions and the environment.

READ: ROW ERUPTS OVER CATALYST TYPE APPROVAL

Parts manufacturers and distributers must ensure their products meet the necessary standards and are correctly marked and approved for the vehicles or engine types that they are intended for.

 

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THE HIDDEN COST OF POOR MENTAL HEALTH IN OUR TRADE

THE HIDDEN COST OF POOR MENTAL HEALTH IN OUR TRADE

By Rebecca Watt – Technician at Avia Sports Cars

According to research carried out by the World Health Organisation, one in four people in the UK will experience a mental health problem each year. Only one in eight of those with a mental health problem are receiving help or treatment. Maybe that’s because they do not know what help is out there, or maybe they think it is not important or serious enough. There are many reasons why someone with an issue such as anxiety or depression may not get the help they need.

The truth is, everyone is affected by mental health at least once in their lives. Although women are more likely to be affected, men are three times as likely to take their own lives. There are about 6,000 suicides in the UK and Republic of Ireland each year and men make up about three quarters of this figure.

Now you’re probably thinking: what has this got to do with the Motor Industry? In fact, the garage trade is particularly affected by instances of poor mental health. Years of heavy lifting, chasing bills and complaining customers can take their toll, but there are many other reasons why an individual who has previously been fine can change to being ‘not okay’ in a short time.

Stress

Stress can build up and affect things like productivity, quality of work and physical health. Consider a lean management system, like any used in production factories and distributor’s warehouses. If any issue, no matter how slight is detected, the problem will be flagged and managers will work to resolve the issue as efficiently as possible. If a problem with a machine or industrial system is fixed so quickly, why then has a government report found that 300,000 people with mental health problems lose their jobs each year? It makes no sense.

From a business point of view, it is important to ensure employees are aware of the help available to them. People spend most of their time in the workplace, so giving employees the basic need of connection and being cared for will have a greater impact on their lives and will only then benefit the company. Employees will respond to this and work to their full potential. Studies have shown that 12.7 percent of all sickness absence days in the UK can be linked to mental health conditions. The government report showed that better mental health support in the workplace could save UK business up to £8 billion PA.

Flexible working

So what can be done in the workplace to improve mental health? A good start is if employers can embrace flexible working. Allowing staff to work flexible hours or schedules to suit them would give them the self-care time that they require to continue working to the best of their abilities. It is equally critical to allow employees to have their entitled time off, or holiday days away from the work environment so they can return bright eyed and bushy tailed.

People suffering with mental health problems are urged to see their GP, plus there are lots of charities that can help – Samaritans and their excellent confidential helpline for example. Specifically for our industry, there is the charity BEN which also offers a confidential support line and will work with individuals. They also offer a range of workplace awareness and engagement initiatives, training programmes and digital assets to help promote its services within companies. If you look after your employees, they will look after your company. Mental health should never be ignored.

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EURO STANDARDS IN A CHANGING EUROPE

PROMOTED: BM Catalysts’ Commercial Director, Mark Blinston writes on the subject of changing standards

 

Mark Blinston

Improving air quality by reducing harmful emissions has been a priority for most for as long as many of us can remember. For the UK automotive sector, the drive for emissions reduction has been primarily powered by EU legislation since 1970. Euro emissions standards, or Euro levels, were introduced in 1992 to limit the acceptable levels of tailpipe emissions of cars and light commercial vehicles in order to reduce their adverse impact on both health and the environment. With the possibility of leaving the EU in just a matter of weeks, it remains uncertain whether there would be significant changes with the emissions standards set for the country.

Euro emissions standards have been vital in reducing the permissible levels of harmful pollutants emitted within exhaust gases, with each tightening standard prompting huge strides forward in the development of new emissions control technology. Euro emissions standards are now at their most restrictive iteration, Euro 6, with all passenger vehicles both diesel and petrol required to meet the lowest pollutant levels set by the legislation to date. Whilst the NOx limit for petrol cars was retained at 60 mg/km, the allowable NOx level amongst diesel cars dropped tremendously to a maximum of 80 mg/km, in comparison to the Euro 5 requirement of 180 mg/km.

UNDERSTANDING

It is important that people have a sound understanding of Euro levels as more and more cities across Europe have already introduced, or are beginning to adopt, ‘Low Emission Zones’ (LEZ) in an effort to eliminate badly polluting vehicles. LEZs are ‘clean air’ zones that restrict the type of vehicle that can enter defined areas at certain times of the day, with hefty penalties and fines in place for non-compliant motors. Although this initiative is becoming more common in major European cities, motorists need to be aware that different Euro levels and requirements are set for each zone. In London for example, the LEZ operates mostly across Greater London, whilst the ’Ultra Low Emission Zone’ (ULEZ) covers the same congestion charge areas of Central London. It is a common misconception that the two are interchangeable, so drivers are advised to always double check before driving through zones they are unfamiliar with to avoid heavy charges. London’s ULEZ require that cars meet a minimum of Euro 4 emissions standards for petrol and Euro 6 for diesel.

Vehicle owners should also be aware that it is a legal requirement to only fit replacement emissions control devices that are correctly approved for the vehicle and to the vehicle’s corresponding Euro level. A replacement part cannot be approved to a lower Euro level than that of the original vehicle. For example, if the vehicle is Euro 6, then the replacement catalyst or DPF must also be approved to Euro 6.   Fitting a Euro 5 part to a Euro 6 vehicle would be illegal.

CATALOGUING

The cataloguing of aftermarket parts can be complex and many consumers remain unaware of the Euro level of their vehicle. Some catalytic converters and DPFs may look physically identical to one another but be very different in terms of what they are legally approved for sale to fit. It is the responsibility of everyone from the manufacturer, to the distributor and even the garage to ensure that the part in question is of the correct Euro level for the vehicle.

However, should the UK leave the EU as intended, it is possible that emissions targets and vehicle requirements may change. According to the UK Home Office, the Department for Transport (DfT) will take over the application and implementation of CO2 standards for cars and vans registered in the UK. UK-specific targets will be implemented, but they are expected to be at least as ambitious as the current EU standards. UK registrations and level of compliance, on the other hand, will be monitored and imposed by the Secretary of State for Transport.

For BM Catalysts as aftermarket manufacturers, we remain responsible for developing products that conform to the legislative requirements and that will not change. As Europe’s leading manufacturer of high-quality aftermarket catalytic converters, DPFs and front pipes, BM Catalysts is committed to ensuring that standards are met, with our homologated catalysts and DPFs being compliant with the appropriate European legislative requirements. We also invest heavily in our online catalogue with the aim of providing as much information as possible when seeking out the correct parts for a vehicle and we have a technical helpline available should further advice be required. Whether the UK leaves the EU or not, it is important to understand that the quality of our products will remain unchanged and will continue to exceed expectations.

For more information, visit: www.bmcatalysts.com

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CHARGING NETWORK FLAWED

Last month it was widely reported that the number of charging points had overtaken the number of petrol stations in the UK. There was a lot of fanfare and ministers, no doubt relieved to be able to say something about a subject that isn’t Brexit, were queuing up to express their delight. 

READ: Could factor fleets ever go electric?

Over 50 different brands of charging points are in the UK

Unfortunately, if you delve into the data a little deeper you’ll see that the picture is not quite as rosy. The numbers, researched by charge point finder Zap-Map belie the fact that there are around 50 separate charging providers each with their own pricing structures. Although a ruling last year means that any can be accessed with a debit card, most users will have a contract of some sort with one or another of the charging providers, which may or may not have any points in the same county where the motorist requires volts. Another depressing stat from the map company is that at any given time roughly a quarter of the chargers are out of use. 

“How the hell are we expected to get to carbon neutral when the charging network is so random, inconsistent and generally awful to use?” tweeted Connor Twomey, Head of PR for Mitsubishi in the UK. Mitsubishi produce the Outlander PHEV, the best selling plug-in hybrid car in the country. 

Conservative MP Bill Wiggin tabled a Private Members’ Bill in an attempt to regulate the payment system. EV users in the UK are currently disadvantaged compared with our European neighbours due to a lack of an interoperable payment system for EV charging” he told a parliament in late 2018. 

READ: GOV. ANNOUNCES INCREASE IN FUNDING FOR EV CHARGING

While it is argued that most people with a plug-in hybrid will charge them at home, so a complex infrastructure isn’t needed, we’d suggest that the number of people who own their own property that has both parking and is able to have a charging point connected may not be as high as Whitehall thinks…

 

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PROMO: HELLA HENGST CABIN FILTER PROGRAMME

PROMO: HELLA HENGST CABIN FILTER PROGRAMME

Blue.care product group

 

PROMOTIONAL ARTICLE ON BEHALF OF HELLA HENGST

Keeping customers in the best of health

HELLA Hengst’s filter programme provides independent workshops with a superb original equipment (OE) option that sets them apart from their competitors. Within the range, which naturally encompasses all filter types, is a cabin filter range that is in a class of its own and features market leading fitting instructions, including where the filter is located in the vehicle.

Hengst, a global leader in filtration and fluid management, is an OE supplier to many of the world’s vehicle manufacturers and its cabin filters are particularly favoured due to their combination of design innovation and special features. As a result, its aftermarket range with HELLA provides technicians with a comprehensive replacement cabin filter solution, available in non-carbon, active carbon, and anti-bacterial (Blue.care®) configurations.

Informing customers

As incomprehensible as it sounds, 540,000 litres of air can enter the cockpit of a vehicle for every hour it is driven and, according to multiple studies, this air typically contains up to five times more contamination from exhaust gases, pollutants and allergens, than the air at the roadside.

Bearing in mind the harmful effects this contamination has on the occupants of the vehicle, which include the driver’s ability to concentrate, there is a direct safety correlation to the quality of the air within the vehicle. Therefore, members have both a positive healthcare message to give their customers in terms of the importance of regular cabin filter replacement, as well as a legitimate profit making opportunity.

Catering for demand

In addition to protecting the vehicle’s air conditioning system and filtering out fine dust and pollen, which is common to all new cabin filters, HELLA Hengst active carbon cabin filters not only collect even smaller dust particles, but also remove bad-smelling odours and hazardous gases such as ozone, smog and exhaust.

However, to provide drivers with the ultimate protection from contaminants, HELLA Hengst has developed the Blue.care anti-bacterial range. Its five element construction adds a fifth level of protection over the active carbon series, in the form of defence against the threat of bacterial build-up in the system and therefore, within the vehicle itself.

Blue.care at a glance

The elements within the Blue.care range comprise an electrostatic media with a pre-filter function to keep out course particles, followed by a filter fleece, which increases its dust retention capacity.

This is followed by the active carbon layer to separate out vapours, odours and harmful gases such as ozone, nitric oxide and sulphur dioxide, plus meltdown medium, which filters out fine dust and micro particles down to incredibly small diameters.

Finally, the pièce de résistance, is the bio-functional layer, which contains nonosilver and provides the filter’s unique anti-microbial, anti-bacterial effect, which make the Blue.care range the ultimate solution for in-car air quality and subsequently increases safety for the driver, their passengers and the wider community.

For more information about the OE quality products available from HELLA Hengst, please call customer services on: 01295 662400 or email hella.sales@hella.com

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