COMPANY
:
Corteco
CATALOGUE
:
Crankshaft Pulley / Vibration Control
CONTACT
:
Steve Jarnet
WEBSITE
:
EMAIL
:

CORTECO engine, transmission and chassis mounts turn noise and vibration into smooth and comfortable driving conditions. The highly sophisticated technology of Corteco products clearly shows in the example of the innovative, decoupled pulley. In addition to the traditional damping of the axial vibrations, the pulley decouples the belt drive from the crankshaft. This reduces the strain on neighbouring components. The lifetime of belt and pulley is extended, while reduced noise levels inside the car mean enhanced ride comfort.

COMPANY
:
Pearl Automotive
CATALOGUE
:
Rubber to Metal Chassis Parts
CONTACT
:
Richard Withers
TEL
:
01268 756216
WEBSITE
:
EMAIL
:

Pearl Automotive launches the first-of-its-kind, comprehensive Rubber to Metal Chassis Parts Catalogue, which includes: steering and chassis link bars, void bushes, engine mountings, strut mounts, friction bearings and bump stops all available now at the point of sale through all leading suppliers of e-Cat electronic catalogues. A simple to use pictorial printed version will be available soon from all leading distributors of Pearl high-tech parts. Contact Pearl Automotive sales support on 01268 756216 for more information.

COMPANY
:
Kilen Springs
CATALOGUE
:
Coil, Gas, Leaf & Sport Springs
CONTACT
:
Robert Glynn
TEL
:
01422 370770
WEBSITE
:
EMAIL
:

Kilen produce the widest range of OE replacement coil springs in the UK, all available from stock. Constant range expansion means we can offer the most comprehensive vehicle parc coverage, as reflected in our range of catalogues featuring over 650 new coil springs and over 350 new gas springs, all carefully selected from the most up-to-date UK car parc information. Every Kilen spring is subjected to the most stringent product quality tests, so quality is always assured.

COMPANY
:
Lesjöfors Springs
CATALOGUE
:
Coil, Gas, Leaf & Sport Springs
TEL
:
01422 370770
WEBSITE
:
EMAIL
:

Lesjöfors, one of the world’s leading automotive spring manufacturers, are proud to present their newest and most comprehensive range of catalogues, covering more than 10,000 coil spring applications, over 1000 gas springs, 200 leaf springs and sports lowering kits spanning more than 35 manufacturers, all ready to go from stock. All catalogues have been produced in the same user friendly format as previous versions, with parts listed by make, model and year to ensure you get the right part first time, every time.

COMPANY
:
ROC
CATALOGUE
:
Coil, Gas, Leaf & Sport Springs
CONTACT
:
Robert Glynn
TEL
:
01422 370770
WEBSITE
:
EMAIL
:

ROC is one of Europe’s leading spring manufacturers, well known within the automotive aftermarket for their high-tech methods of construction, corrosion resistance and longevity. ROC’s latest catalogues feature their biggest ranges to date, covering coil, gas, leaf and sport springs, with all parts manufactured to OE standards and complete with a 3 year warranty. Peace of mind, excellent quality and competitive prices makes ROC the right choice for you.

COMPANY
:
LEMFÖRDER
CATALOGUE
:
Lemforder 2010/2011 Steering & Suspension
TEL
:
0845 850 7145
WEBSITE
:
EMAIL
:

The new 2010/2011 edition of the LEMFÖRDER Steering & Suspension catalogue will be available from ZF Services this summer. Steering and suspension components are safety critical, so only the best will do. That’s why the leading vehicle manufacturers put their trust in LEMFÖRDER. We supply steering and suspension parts to more than 40 per cent of the world’s OE market. The brand assures customers of OE quality components backed by full technical support, essential requirements for these critical applications. The full range is available from 70 Branches of ECP.

COMPANY
:
KEEPING REMAN AT THE CORE

Tom Curtis shows CAT around Shaftec’s HQ in Hockley

Long-established brake and steering remanufacturer Shaftec has been on a multi-million pound expansion programme over the last few years, having relocated the majority of operations from its previous Nechells site to a modern 42,000 sq ft. industrial space in 2015. The move has since enabled the Tecdoc data supplier to double its production and stock capacity, supplying over 6,000 drive shafts and 1,300 CV joint references to the aftermarket, backed-up by a recent brand and website revamp. This is where we met with Shaftec Sales Director Tom Curtis who took us through the day-to-day operation.

CORE
Our first stop began at the delivery depot where staff carried out their daily runs to collect and return old core for a second chance of life. However, there is a mandatory procedure to undertake before products are restocked on the shelves. “Our drivers go and collect the core which is booked in electronically”, said Curtis. “Everything has to come back in Shaftec boxes for two reasons, one, it’s easy identification because it’s got our part number on it and we know what parts are in the box, which is checked with images when it comes back in. Separate to that, the driver’s sheet will tally up the return with what’s in the box so they can match up to each part”, adding that the firm will usually receive up to 20 pallets a day.

CHECK-IN
Parts brought back are checked- in individually through the company’s online booking system. With many components to get through, Curtis and the team have adopted a quick and efficient process that incorporates separate check-in points for each product category. A check-in station is also utilised for stock not fit for remanufacturing which is something crucial that Curtis is trying to make customers aware of. “We’re traing customers to look for the right returns. In turn, our customers are training garages to make sure that when something comes back off of the car that it’s fit for remanufacturing” Curtis continued. “Things like this can carry a £100 surcharge and if you reject them, it’s going to cause upset so we try to educate our consumers as much as we can from that perspective”.

Calipers await a second life

PRODUCTION
The next phase involves bringing components to the production benches where operators will strip down driveshafts and calipers to bare metal, before adding in new pistons, seals and CV joints later on. Before this can be executed, parts must first enter a deep clean process via the Shot Blasting Machines to remove all traces of rust and grease. “The Shot Blast Machines will take rust off to make it a clear part and we’ll use a Soda Blaster System for more intricate parts where rust gets into certain areas of the component”, said Curtis. After this, the casing gets a fresh coat of paint.

ORDERS
The firm can process up to 300 orders a day managed through Shaftec’s in-house production system. This provides staff with a run down of all the components required for each customer purchase. The system follows a similar set up to core check-in whereby operators will construct driveshafts and calipers at separate assembly points along with computer systems, assisting them with the essential CV and outer joints needed for each customer order. Curtis elaborated. “Our IT system tells operators what they have to build and what model the CV joints are. Our programme also tracks the status of who’s building it and how many are being built each day”.

Before ending up in Shaftec branded packaging, calipers are pressure tested in all car conditions and receive a part number after the all clear. “We have three testing machines to test each caliper before it’s boxed up” said Curtis. “Like a traffic light, it either passes or fails and typically 1/100 will fail and end up in scrap”.

MOVING FORWARD
Once our tour finished, Curtis explained that the firm’s next agenda is increasing stock capacity further by building another mezzanine floor to cater for its steering portfolio. He concluded. “We almost have all of our wares in-house but eventually, we want to bring the remaining units from our Nechelles site into this space with the addition of a new mezzanine floor for steering racks and pumps”. The supplier has also said it has taken on more electrical steering systems as hybrid and Connected Car technology becomes more commonplace in the years to come.

COMPANY
:
KEEPING IN LINE WITH TRADITION

Ian Hughes shows us around Wilcox Limousines in Wigan, Lancashire

Whatever the economy is doing, there’s one business that will never run out of customers, and as a reliable supplier to funeral directors across the nation, Wilcox Limousines has enjoyed steady orders for almost 70 years.

OFFERINGS AND SERVICES

Founded by William and May Wilcox in the late 1940s, the Wigan-based firm originally provided chauffeured vehicles to the nearby Eagle Studios, but a turning point came when Wilcox began to buy and sell limousines in addition to hiring them out. Another key deal for the business was with Daimler to supply coach built bodies on the DS420 platform.

It’s fair to say the family’s hard work paid off for them operating across three locations and generating a company turnover in excess of £20m. The current Wigan site was our stop today comprising a 55,000 sq ft. warehouse space, 60 staff and plenty of shiny limousines to feast one’s eye on. We met William’s granddaughter Leila who provided an insight into the third generation business. “We are a family business selling to family businesses”, she said. “90 percent of our turnover is UK-based funeral directors and we recently launched our Jaguar XF Hearse for the overseas market which is rapidly growing”.

To say Wilcox Limousines only caters to funeral directors would be false, as there are many services in the firm’s itinerary including classic car restoration and prototype projects for car rallies. Leila elaborates. “We also have people coming to us for supercharged limousines from commercial backgrounds. At our Northampton site we perform classic car restoration and one off prototype projects where we have a strong development team in-house”.

WAREHOUSE TOUR
Production Director Ian Hughes took us around the warehouse to get a gist of the business. The first point of call started in the depot where a number of new and used Jaguar XJ and Volvo S80 models were lined up for service. For vehicles coming directly from the VM’s factory, a job number is generated along with a spec sheet and route card. Hughes added. “From that point, a pre-delivery inspection is carried out to ensure there are no Jaguar issues we can’t solve, otherwise, it goes back to the local dealer who can claim it back on their warranty”.

Hearse production

Once given the all clear, the vehicle is stripped down to its shell removing the glass, wiring and interior to begin the process. “Once the glass has been taken out we have a glass transporter that takes it to our Northampton site” said Hughes. “Bodywork extension is carried out there using aluminium for the Jaguar XJ hearses and limousines ”. A key factor when constructing these vehicles is ‘keeping them in line with tradition’, meaning each hearse is measured to the correct height allowing enough head space for undertakers to wear a top hat inside without fear of knocking it over.

After the bodywork extension is complete, the hearse is hand painted and its original components restored. “All the parts that came off the job will be fitted back on the vehicle”, Hughes continued. “We will then install the side windows, carpets, interiors and complete the deck work, hearse seating and the rest of the tailgate”, adding that the firm buys the exact materials originally fitted to the vehicle from its VM’s supplier.

TOOLS AND TRAINING
The vehicle will then enter the ramp and is rigorously tested for leaks, fault codes, followed by a test drive in different driving conditions ensuring it meets or champions that of the VM’s original specifications. This is backed-up with Jaguar’s diagnostic tools and training on site as Leila explains. “We have invested over £1m in tooling and equipment. As the VMs release new technology we will be implementing it while working alongside our key manufacturers”. Hughes concurs. “Our first point of call is our Jaguar dealer. We have our own Service Region Manager from Jaguar who visits us frequently to make sure we are up-to-date with the latest diagnostic tools and training offerings”. A detailing bay is used at the final checkpoint where the hearse/limousine gets the once over and a full inspection, checking every nook and cranny is intact before it’s sent out for delivery.

EXPANSION PLANS
Leila and her family have some exciting plans in the pipeline, which includes marketing expanding into new territory. She concluded. “We have never marketed overseas, but now we are branching out internationally with our Jaguar XF hearse as well as progressing with our car restoration and prototype businesses. I think the long term plan will be expanding our Wigan site rather than build more premises around the UK”. The Wilcox family are also brainstorming ideas to commend the firm’s 70th anniversary next year with talks of a 1940’s themed celebration on the cards. Whatever they decide to do will be a great event to commend May and William’s legacy.

COMPANY
:
GSF, BBC SUPERFACTORS AND A1 ADD LOCATIONS

New A1 store in Leicester

Three chains have added to their network. GSF has opened a new branch to the north of Bristol, which will be its third outlet in that city. The new location is located in the Aztec business part, near a junction of the M5.

The drive to encourage trade customers to try the new branch has been headed by GSF’s Business Development Manager Leighton Phillips, who has been visiting local independent garages in the weeks running up the opening. The company says that the whole project, from inception to opening day, was completed in just eight weeks.

“We’ve got an experienced team in place who know Bristol well,” said Simon McMullen, Regional Director at GSF Car Parts. “We’re sure there’s even more potential for us around the area and we’ve been excited by the enthusiastic response already.”
Parts Alliance-owned BBC Superfactors has moved premises, just a year after first opening in Preston.

The new building boasts double the footprint at 10,000 square feet and has a full mezzanine too, boosting storage capacity to around “We needed space for tyres,”
explained Managing Director Gary Shulman. “We’re importing containers of tyres and the new unit has the facility to handle these bulk deliveries.”

Meanwhile, A1 Motor Stores has welcomed a new branch opened by a member. Mohammed Y Suleman with the help of various family members has opened an accessory shop in Leicester, which is the second branch owned by Suleman. A factoring service to the trade has led the team to buy their first parts van. Speaking of his decision to join A1, Suleman said: “The branding attracted me. The shop looks more professional with the A1 Motor Stores signage outside, and shows you are part of a bigger thing”.

COMPANY
:
AUTOMECHANIKA IN REVIEW

For us at the magazine, it is funny to think that 2017 was only the second time Automechanika has taken place at the NEC, such is the amount that we have written and speculated about it. Nonetheless, this is only the second time the show has happened here, and it seems much of the aftermarket holds an opinion about it.

For me, the proceedings started the day before the event as SMMT had invited a handful of journalists to dinner at a nearby country pile to talk about the show, the aftermarket and the motor industry in general. One interesting stat that Chief Exec Mike Hawes raised was that the British public now spend more online on car accessories than they do on cosmetics. I haven’t been able to verify this yet, and I suspect it includes replacement tyres and servicing booked online, but even so it goes to show that the new generation of motorists are less willing to do things the old way. A point to ponder perhaps.

After the show was opened, complete with ribbon cutting and the traditional comedy big scissors (I wonder where they come from?) the show got underway and we grab show organiser Simon Albert for a few words. As the show had only just opened, he didn’t have much to tell us that we didn’t already know, such as the longer opening hours, increase in aisle space etc. However, he did confirm his hit list of companies that he’d like to see attending in the future and, of most significance to us, confirmed that the show would return next year.

On the Valeo stand

This surprised me a little, as I’d assumed that the show would become biennial in the years that the Frankfurt show was not held. However, I was keen to get going as my appointment book was full and I was running late before I had even started.

The first visit took me across Hall 19 and into Hall 20 where I could have a quick look at some of the stands as I scurried past. Liqui Moly and Auto Repar had particularly amazing looking stands. Schaeffler had used a space right next to the main entrance to build a gleaming white stage where cutaway versions of various products had been mounted on plinths for the reps to demonstrate. Valeo meanwhile, had approached the concept of having a stand in a different way, as it had simply brought a huge truck and trailer kitted out with demonstration models of various things into the hall.

MEANDERING
I won’t trouble you with the details of every meeting I had or what everyone said, except that on the first day a number of stands reported that footfall seemed a little low, which could be down to appalling weather that day as well as a crash blocking one of the motorways near the NEC that may have put some off attending. I should add that if the attendance was low on the first day, I didn’t notice it. From my point of view, Hall 19, where I spent the bulk of the time, seemed annoyingly busy with meandering people with a tendency to stop in front of me filling the aisles.

It was pleasing to see that many exhibitors had brought in things other than their products to keep people amused. Sales-i brought an Out Run arcade machine for example (a game that I spent too much time on in my youth). Denso brought a VR racing car simulator, which I quite fancied trying out, but decided not to as the racing driver Rebecca Jackson was looking on, and I had no wish to humiliate myself. Other stands brought various cars and bikes from series that they sponsor as well as the usual show novelties.

Holding an event after the show is always a risk, because while there will be a ready supply of people in the industry who are in the same place, there is no telling that they will be in the mood to go somewhere else after spending a day at the show. Even if they do, there is every chance that someone else has invited them first. With this in mind, I was curious to see how many people went to an event held by Motaquip at Warwick Castle on the first night. The answer as it turned out was a lot of people as the event was full. It was one of the more fun events that we’ve been to, with two apparently empty suits of armour jumping off the wall and alarming diners by staging a battle between the tables.

STAGES
Back at the show the following day I would have liked to have had more time to attend some of the industry and technical seminars that were taking place on a number of stages across the halls. Big names from the world of diagnostics including Frank Massey and James Dillon had been brought in as a lure to get technicians to the show (which by all accounts worked) while the heads of the garage associations talked about the various threats and opportunities du jour in the aftermarket. I did manage to get over to hear the winner of the Garage of the Year announced, which turned out to be Motorserv UK, which readers who have been paying close attention might recall we visited this time last year.

One notable absence from the show was TMD Friction (who are on record saying that they have ‘no plans’ to exhibit). However, the company did rent a plaza suite just outside of the main halls to hold a Pagid Live event in association with Euro Car Parts where a number of garage owners and technicians (the majority of whom had been brought down for the event) who, after a day at the show spend a couple of hours enjoying presentations on the benefits of the Pagid Expert programme and on ECPs garage scheme (see Hot Story).

If your reason for visiting the show was to find new products, you wouldn’t have been disappointed. Delphi brought a new bit of diagnostic kit for high- pressure injectors, European Exhaust and Catalyst introduced a 6-in-1 fuel system cleaner at the show and in a similar vein, Forté launched a 4-in-1 cleaning machine. Essentra Components launched something called a ‘High Tech Fluid Absorption Plug’ and I’m sure there were many other things never before seen at the event.

Throughout the show, I spent most of my time in the three aftermarket halls, but on the final day I had a meeting with Stericycle (a company that manages recalls for the VMs) and so I spent a while exploring the area dedicated to the automotive supply chain. It was markedly quieter than the aftermarket halls, although it should be noted that while the supply chain market as a whole is huge and worth big money, the number of buyers within it is relatively small, and stands dealing with VM services were of little interest to technicians, so it might be unfair to judge its success on the amount of feet in the room alone.

‘Billy’ character on Bosch stand

However, the highlight of the show for me came late in the afternoon on the final day when Helen Watkins from Bosch, who was manning the Extra stand, was accosted by a strange small man who kept offering her some of his special ‘home made’ sweets, much to the amusement of onlookers – apparently he’d been coming on the stand and doing this at various points throughout the show. However, just when Helen couldn’t stand the embarrassment anymore, the fellow took off what turned out to be a wig and false teeth to reveal himself as a well known customer of the firm. Apparently, his alter-ego ‘Billy No-Mates’ is a character that he regularly performs for some of his unsuspecting suppliers, and it was much to the amusement of the crowd that had built up.

It was almost time for us to leave in order to high-tail it back to London while there was still time to vote (remember that?) One point that is inescapable is the topic of the show frequency. As a conservative guess, I reckon I spoke to 40 company bosses during the show and the overwhelming majority said that they thought the show should run once every two years, preferably during the non- Frankfurt years in order to keep costs reasonable and keep the momentum of the show. From the point of view of the whole CAT team, we could have happily stayed there for a month if we could – there were so many people to see. However, I’m always curious to know the experience of our readers. Did you go? Were you exhibiting? What were the highlights, and what would you have liked to have seen? Give me a shout at greg.whitaker@haymarket.com.

Advertisement
  • What's in a name? Reboxing & product liability risk
  • Rising from the ashes: Phoenix companies explained
  • Winter wares for the festive season

more info

    • Sorry, there are no polls available at the moment.
    • Popular
    • Latest
    • Comments
    • Tags
    • Subscribe