Tag Archive | "aftermarket"

IAAF CONFERENCE SPEAKERS ANNOUNCED

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IAAF CONFERENCE SPEAKERS ANNOUNCED


The proceedings for the IAAF’s Annual Conference are well underway with a variety of industry speakers set to take centre stage and discuss the ‘real’ issues affecting the aftermarket, post Brexit.

So far, confirmed speakers include Dr. Julia Saini (Frost and Sullivan), Allistair Preston (whocanfixmycar) as well as Steve Nash (IMI), Olaf Heffing (Mahle) and more. The event will be facilitated by racing car legend Johnny Herbert who will help debate other topics on the federation’s agenda including the Connected Car and the government’s recent announcement for the abolishment of petrol and diesel vehicles by 2040.

IAAF Chief Exec Wendy Williamson said, “The expertise, experience and insight provided by our speakers will, I believe, feature in the future strategic planning of all those that attend”, she added. “We’re looking to the future, but we also recognise the pressures faced by our members today and will aim to provide some clarity and insight into these challenges”.

This year’s conference will take place at the Players Suite, Double Tree by Hilton on Thursday 7th December. For those invited, don’t forget your black tie!

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JAPANPARTS EXTENDS SENSOR OFFERING

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JAPANPARTS EXTENDS SENSOR OFFERING


PROMOTION ARTICLE ON BEHALF OF JAPANPARTS GROUP

Japanparts Group. New product
ABS sensors. Pre-code: ABS- / 151- / 151

What is the ABS sensor for?
The ABS sensor – positioned on the constant-velocity joint or near the wheel hub – has the fundamental task of constantly updating the ABS control unit, reading the speed of each individual wheel through a cog wheel. The ABS sensor is the fundamental element in the braking system because, as it continuously communicates with the control unit, it significantly increases driving safety by stopping the vehicle in the quickest and safest way possible.

The ABS sensor transmits the tangential velocity – measured on the wheel – to the other systems. The electronic control unit processes this information (slipping or differences in velocity between wheels), activating the anti-blocking system on the brakes. If the ABS sensor detects a loss of traction on the wheels, the ABS system adjusts the pressure of the fluid in the individual cylinders and activates the pump that excludes the manual system and acts immediately on the brake.

Why to check the ABS sensor?
It is good practice, every 2 years, to check the electrical parts inside the braking system. The ABS braking system tends to deteriorate the most during the winter months, owing to the extreme weather conditions and the salt on the roads.

The main causes of replacement of ABS sensors may also be: damage from collision or accidental contact with the gravel found on the road, impact with the tone wheel owing to a bearing anomaly. If the sensor is broken, the entire ABS system is deactivated.

What are we offering?

With a coverage of 89% of the vehicles on the roads, Japanparts Group further extends its range of ABS sensors with more than 500 codes available for Asian, European and American vehicles, and add our range items that are usually difficult to find, such as cam shaft position sensors or crankshaft position sensors.

ABS sensors under the Japanparts, Ashika and Japko brands are guaranteed for 24 months, and offer a high-quality equivalent alternative to the original product, and are used in ABS, ASR and GPS systems. They are made with special plastic materials and have high quality electro-technical and electro-mechanical properties, which guarantee a high level of resistance. The sensors and connecting cables are capable of resisting extreme temperatures between -40 °C and +125 °C.

Click and download the ABS Sensor Catalog: http://www.japanpartsgroup.com/splash/page

The ABS braking system
What is the ABS braking system for?

When, in a dangerous situation, the driver brakes hard on the brake pedal, the wheels get stuck and skid over the road surface. This has the following results:

– A loss of directional control, with the vehicle swerving. – A lack of control of the vehicle. – An increase in the space required to stop. – Deformation of the tyres. – An increase in accidents.

When the brake pedal is pushed all the way down, the ABS system adjusts the pressure on the individual cylinders, in relation to the acceleration or deceleration of the wheels.

What are the advantages of an ABS system?

ABS stops the wheels from locking during the braking phase, therefore:

– Directional stability is maintained.
– The vehicle’s manoeuvrability is ensured.
– There is a reduction in braking distance. – The tyres are not damaged. – Many accidents are avoided.

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KEEPING A CAP ON THE PRESSURE

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KEEPING A CAP ON THE PRESSURE


Times are changing in the radiator business, but Nick White has adapted.

NRG is the only radiator shop in Leeds.

There was a time when every market town in the land had a couple of independent radiator reconditioners, or at least a branch of a national chain such as Serck Marston. However, time moves on. “Reconditioning of car radiators is a dying industry” said Nick White, proprietor of Leeds- based Northern Radiators. “Radiators used to be copper and brass so you either went to the main dealer for a new one, or came to us to recondition it. Now the tanks are plastic, there is not the need”.

“The factories can just stamp out the plastic tanks and that’s what they do in China”. White adds that because some of these companies supply the public directly through auction sites, trying to import and compete in this sector is a waste of effort. “There’s more profit in selling the radiator cap on eBay than there is selling the whole unit” he remarked glibly.

However, where there’s brass, there’s more brass (as the old Yorkshire saying almost goes) and Northern Radiators has cut out a niche for itself in remanufacturing heavy duty and specialist rads that do still have heavy metal construction. “We do both corporate and private accounts, from councils and airports to people with classic cars” White explains, and to demonstrate the fact we went and had a look at the workshop’s ‘in tray’. Straight away we noticed some familiar-looking classic references, apparently from a Ford Cortina and a Triumph Vitesse, while another customer dropped off a radiator from his Rolls-Royce as we were speaking.

RANGE
Alongside these rads sat some more heavy-duty ones, apparently from fork-lift trucks, while another couple of huge and ancient-looking units waited, which had apparently come from backup generators in the basement of a building somewhere. Apart from cooling system radiators, the firm can also supply and recondition oil coolers, intercoolers and heater matrixes. It also offers a service to repair fuel tanks and sump pans.

Despite White’s earlier dismissal of new replacement rads, the firm does stock a number of quality performance parts from suppliers Mishimoto and Koyo, mainly as upgrades over OE for vehicles such as Subaru Impreza and Mitsubishi Evo. These high-end parts are bought by enthusiasts and command a reasonable margin.

While the firm has been at its current 3000 sq ft location for a few years, it dates back much further. In fact, the business was started in 1920. After the second world war, Nick White’s father Paul started his own radiator company following demobilisation. He acquired Northern Radiators in 1948. Now 94 years old and retired he still takes an active interest in the company. Northern Radiators was set up as a company in 1920. My father had come out of the army and started is own radiator company after the war and acquired Northern Radiators in 1948. He’s name is Paul White and he is 94 and still alive” said White.

TRADITION
Another traditional aspect of the business is the way in which radiators are recored which could make a fascinating article of its own, but in short involves quite a lot of hydrochloric acid and radiators tested under pressure. “The principal remains exactly the same” agrees White. “With modern health and safety we are a bit more switched on than a traditional operation, but radiators are very similar”.

And according to White, it will continue to be radiators at the ‘core’ of the business for a while yet. “We’ve tried various other things but we always keep coming back to radiators. At the moment we are very busy on radiators, just seven people. We are lean and mean and it is manageable” he concluded.

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KNOW YOUR LIMITS: SET AN ALCOHOL POLICY

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KNOW YOUR LIMITS: SET AN ALCOHOL POLICY


What is the best policy for booze in the workplace?

Sensible policies for alcohol at work are encouraged

Do you have a policy on alcohol in the workplace? If you don’t then you are hardly unusual as most British companies either don’t have anything written at all, or they swing the other way and have an absolute zero-tolerance policy… which may or may not be enforced.

However, you should have a policy in place and have the means to enforce it. As the trend for fines for corporate manslaughter and injury continues to significantly increase across the UK, the emphasis on employers to operate strong and effective health and safety policies and practices has never been more vital.

KNOW THE LAW
Aside from drugs and alcohol costing British businesses in excess of £6 billion per year in lost productivity, under the Transport and Works Act 1992 it is a criminal offence for any worker to be unfit to operate due to drink or drugs and employers must show due diligence to prevent such offences from occurring in the workplace.
Laws that relate to drink- driving are of special interest to motor factors or any other business that has a van fleet. Don’t forget that limits vary within the UK with England, Wales and Northern Ireland having the highest permitted limit of 35 micrograms per 100ml of breath, compared to Scotland’s reduced limit of 22 micrograms, which is in line with the majority of the rest of Western Europe.

BEST PRACTICE
Of course, these limits are perhaps moot if your company has an absolute zero policy on alcohol. However, such a policy might not actually be the best plan. Suzannah Robin, a Director at breathalyzer maker AlcoDigital said: “One of the first steps in setting best practice policy is deciding a company alcohol limit. There will be many factors determining what this should be and it will very much depend on your business operations, however, we would always recommend that an employer sets the limit below the current legal drink-driving limit rather than at a dead zero”.

“Whilst zero may sound like a target every business should be aiming for, it can also cause issues where there may be discrepancies in results, caused by things such as liquor in chocolates or alcohol in medicines. Instead, using a scale of differing limits to determine the next steps an employer should instigate in the event of a positive alcohol test will provide staff with a clear set of rules and help to avoid any unjustified gross misconduct disciplinaries” she added.

EVIDENCE
If a company intends to screen staff on a regular basis it can use a Home Office approved breathalyzer. However, should a screening test reveal a positive result, a company will be obliged to re-test the employee.

Of course it isn’t just about the type of equipment being used, but also how the procedure is carried out and followed through. This means making sure staff implementing alcohol workplace policy have the sufficient training to perform such tests fairly and effectively. Robin explained: “If an employer does not follow best practice policy this can cause issues further down the line, particularly if an employee has tested positive for alcohol. Therefore, professional and reliable training is absolutely crucial for those being assigned to implement alcohol testing policies in the workplace.”

Posted in CAT Know-How, Factor & Supplier News, Garage News, News, Retailer NewsComments (0)

PAGID AWARDS WORKSHOP WITH £10,000 UPGRADE

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PAGID AWARDS WORKSHOP WITH £10,000 UPGRADE


PROMOTION ARTICLE ON BEHALF OF PAGID

Pagid, the UK’s biggest braking brand and part of TMD Friction, has awarded a UK workshop a £10,000 upgrade, through its Workshop Winners campaign, which took place this summer.

ABP Motorsport’s Chris Meredith entered the Workshop Winners competition after purchasing Pagid brake parts from his local Euro Car Parts. After over 12,500 entries, Chris was drawn as the grand prize winner.

Chris was presented with the cheque for £10,000 by Head of UK Sales for TMD Friction Nick Hayes and Euro Car Parts Marketing Director, Bill Stimson.

The cheque allows ABP Motorsport to choose from the biggest range and best workshop equipment from Euro Car Parts Workshop Solutions – with Pagid picking up the tab.

Chris Meredith, Managing Director of ABP Motorsport, commented:

“I’ve been purchasing Pagid for over six years now. They were the first to coat their brake discs to prevent corrosion when standing still. I admire the OE quality, availability and the premium packaging. Our customers appreciate the way they look too.

“Lots of our equipment here at ABP needs upgrading, especially our MOT bay. The money will help us to make the necessary improvements and will kick start our bigger plans to make substantial investments to benefit our team and loyal customers.”

There have been many more winners in the Workshop Winners campaign too, with instant wins including 18-piece pneumatic wind back toolsets, 10-piece pro brake toolsets, Workshop Winners t-shirts and A3 retro signs.

Sylvie Layec, Sales Director, IAM at TMD Friction, commented:

“Workshops across the UK are working tirelessly day in, day out to serve their customers. Through our Proud to Fit garages, we already reward hard-working mechanics, but this summer we wanted to go one step further.

“Through the £10,000 ABP Motorsport has won, we expect to see a significant impact that will reward the garage for all their hard work. We are looking forward to seeing the effect this prize will have and the upgrades they make.”

Pagid will continue to support and reward UK garages with further promotions throughout the year. Keep up to date by visiting pagid.com and signing up to the newsletter.

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LDS ACQUIRED BY GROUPAUTO PARENT

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LDS ACQUIRED BY GROUPAUTO PARENT


LDS website

South Wales-based motor factor LDS appears to have been acquired by Alliance Automotive Group, parent of Groupauto.

Neither party has issued a statement as of yet (AAG usually issues quaterly round- ups of its activities) however, Companies House Lyndon Smith, Louise Smith and Wayne Thomas were terminated as Directors in July, while John Coombes, the Finance Director at Alliance Automotive Group was appointed Director on the same day. Additionally, the registered office details have been changed to AAG’s Birmingham HQ.

LDS was formed in 1990 and the first branch was in Barry. Over the years the company grew to three branches, the largest of which was a new site in Barry measuring 19,000sq ft. A merger in 2014 with factor Normag led to the creation of a branch called LDS Normag. At the time of writing, the chain consists of 30 vans and 60 staff. It has enjoyed a good relationship with Groupauto, winning the coveted ‘Member of the Year’ award in 2014.

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GROWTH IN SPARTAN TIMES

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GROWTH IN SPARTAN TIMES


Spartan Motor Factors explain how expanding an independent factor chain in an age of consolidation is a bold move.

Inside the stockroom

It’s a busy morning in an industrial unit in Bridgend. Pickers run between almost-completed racks of car parts while phones ring and a printer spews out orders. Somewhere, a huge and noisy vacuum cleaner and a hammer drill wail intermittently like some industrial banshee.

We’re in the latest branch of Spartan Motor Factors on opening day, and it’s fair to say that the building, which was once home to a Partco, has not seen this level of activity for many years.

Not that getting the branch ready has been anything like glamour. “We were here all weekend putting up the racking” Director Lee Gratton says balefully, adding that there was still some work to do, but the factor was now ready to the phone lines and the roller doors for the garages of Bridgend.

Spartan is a relatively recent name on the factor scene. Started in 2012 by Lee Gratton, Jason Farrugia and Daniel Webb the company used the Motaquip scheme of supplying a stockpack of parts and consumables to the firm’s first branch in Newport. Both Gratton and Webb had a background of working in factors, while Farrugia was experienced in accountancy.

A branch in Cardiff followed a year later, which became the Head Office. It was, to be polite, a challenging time for an independent factor to go on an expansion drive. Private equity fuelled the growth of the main players, with the Parts Alliance and Groupauto making acquisitions, while Euro Car Parts famously opened a dozen branches in a single day in early 2013, leading to a war of attrition between the big players, which the newcomers had to find an answer. “Yes, it was not easy” laughed Gratton.

SOURCING STOCK
One of the problems related to sourcing stock. “With suppliers, their involvement with other motor factors can prevent you from opening an account” explained Gratton. “When we first opened in Newport, a supplier put in its range of stock – and a month later they came back and took it all out saying ‘sorry, we’ll give you a refund, but there is a conf lict of supply here. We are going to lose one of our biggest customers if we continue to supply you”. This was a reoccurring theme of the early days. “I had to ask why we can’t still have an account, but have our own separate deals?” Gratton pondered.

Spartan staff

There was a logical solution to getting hands on brands from a range of suppliers, and that was to join a buying group. Initially, the choice was the PDP, but just over a year later Spartan left and joined the IFA. There are always issues in swapping buying groups, but Jason Farrugia says the biggest problem was removing and replacing stock. “One of the main difficulties was cleansing the old stock out of the five branches” he recalled. “In terms of the brands themselves, it was not too much of a problem with customers as they were familiar with most of them, such asKYBandFAI–itisn’tas though we are trying to sell anything unknown.

On the subject of brands, buying group membership has helped Spartan move some offerings upmarket, “We’ve moved over to Wix and Mahle on filtration and it has improved our filter business no end” Farrugia said. “Before, we had a mix of brands. A quality product is something customers don’t mind paying a small amount extra for, and they don’t try to push you down on the price of filters”.

Apart from access to brands, the knowledge base of the IFA has proven to be useful. “The IFA were really strong in the area and the brands were very strong. My co-Directors knew them from their Welsh Autoparts days, and I must say they have been brilliant” says Farrugia. “In the nine months since we have been members, I have learnt more about MAM, stockholdings and purchasing than I did for the whole five years that we have been in business before”.

Going back to opening day here in Bridgend, it will come as no surprise that the building is well suited to be a motor factor considering the previous occupant. Easy access to allow goods in and out is supported by a large stock room, with potential for a mezzanine. The building has an upstairs area with a meeting room and an office, while downstairs the original counter has been extended backwards to incorporate a small showroom area. This is still the subject of much drilling, hammering and Hoovering on our visit, although we manage to clear the area long enough to get a group photo.

Starting a factor chain in an era of consolidation might not be for the faint hearted, but Spartan hasn’t ruled out further expansion. “We have always been a little off the cuff… If the right opportunity presents itself” concluded Gratton.

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TIME IS AN ENEMY WHEN YOU ARE HIRING STAFF

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TIME IS AN ENEMY WHEN YOU ARE HIRING STAFF


Don’t let the clock tick down when you need to fill a sales role

Let’s talk about time. If recruiting for a role yourself, you will spend countless hours sifting through applications and initial screenings.

At its most simple, using a recruiter will save you time and to use an example, time is critical when filling vacant sales roles. If the territory is vacant it means that another employee or even the hiring manager is covering the area and this could result in a loss in revenue as customers are not getting the right amount of contact. Another implication, people are human and if someone is covering two roles rather than just their own, it will cause issues. Trust me, I’ve been there!

People will talk sometimes to a recruiter rather than apply direct as it offers them in some cases some anonymity, also the roles I work on are not out there plastered across the job boards for all to see. Using a recruiter cuts out the headache of marketing the role, finding candidates and organising meetings. My ‘specialism’ (a horrible term) is in the body refinish market, but the same rules apply across the aftermarket and elsewhere.

But what if the boot is on the other foot and you are a candidate?. Why would you consider going to a recruiter instead of approaching the firms that interest you directly? Ideally, any good recruitment agency should act as the ‘compère’, between you as a candidate and a potential employer. Putting the right people in front of the right employer is a skill, encountering a large number of variables along the way. Yes, the skills must be right to do the role however much more is involved. There aremany more elements which come together to make the perfect candidate including personalities need to match with company culture and ethics. A good recruiter will understand the needs to match all aspects, the candidate must be right for the business in the same breath as the client being right for the candidate ensuring longevity for both client and candidate alike. Believe me this is no easy task.

Recruiters (well the good ones), have a network of hiring managers, business influencers and decision makers in multiple businesses. Something that as a candidate you in all likelihood don’t have, or not to the extent of an agent. All of these things go back to the issue of making the most of the limited time available – don’t waste yours.

TOP CANDIDATES MOVE QUICKLY

Research shows that from the start of the hiring process the top 10 percent of candidates have disappeared from the market in the first two working weeks. So, considering the average time to hire in the UK is approximately 28 days, the candidates remaining in your process from working day 11 onward are unlikely to be the right fit or the most qualified for your role. However, some companies will attempt to make a ‘good fit’ from the limited candidates now available and in effect taking on someone who doesn’t entirely fit the role because they need it filled and the slow process has cost them the best candidates.

In addition to this, a long hiring process is often the top reason candidates speak negatively about a brand or company. Candidates are now researching online reviews from former candidates or employees in the same way that they would from (say) Trip Advisor, when looking at holiday destinations. The result of this is that it can add 10 percent to the cost of every hire.

Remember the hiring process clock starts ticking as soon as that candidate submits the application not when you review it or when they sit in front of you at interview. By then the damage could have been done and your ideal candidate could have slipped through your fingers! So how long is your hiring process? Do you need to make changes?
Gavin Collier

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A POINT OF DIFFERENCE

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A POINT OF DIFFERENCE


David Williams takes us on tour around Michelin Licensee Future Developments.

Stoke-on-Trent is known as the Potteries for its heritage in throwing all kinds of clay, from fine bone china to toilet pans. However, in recent years the city has become a logistics hub housing many distribution centres. A major player here is Future Developments – a manufacturer supplying car care products and aerosols to large retailers up and down the country.

18 months ago, the firm inked a deal with Michelin where it became an official licensee for the UK and Ireland. Dave Williams, Sales Director of the firm, explained: “We manufacture specifically for niche markets. We never had a brand before and Michelin came to mind because it was in local [Michelin has a niche tyre production facility in nearby Shelton] and they were keen to do it”. He continued. “We’re looking to create a brand over the next two to three years by bringing in and making products with a difference”.

With 700 products to manufacture, a large space and the essential amenities are required. While touring the site, Future Developments seems to have all the facilities to hand with a 7,000 sq ft site containing three shipping containers for raw materials and bottles, an aerosol storage plant and a production warehouse where over 10,000 Michelin-branded products are produced each day, before they’re tried and tested on site. Once approved and set to the required standards, products are boxed up and packaged for distribution.

PRODUCTS AND PROMOTIONS
Another well-used area is the mock-shop showroom, which has a plethora of retail products sporting the Michelin brand. Wheel trims, inspection lamps and breakdown kits were displayed on shelves next to the firm’s other wares such as insect repellents and stain removers for the household domestics market as well as graffiti removal – a regular purchase among city councils across the UK. Ray Bowles, Managing Director of Future Developments, said. “We distribute all the Michelin wiper blades as well as snow brushes, ice scrapers, snow shovels and wheel trims”, adding that the firm has expanded its wiper blade distribution overseas.

Williams mentions that retail customers can benefit from some handy upsell opportunities such as Michelin point of sale (POS) display stands. He adds. “Customers can purchase our promotion stands to upsell their products in store. Another example is our screenwash, which we’ve designed so it can interlock with other bottles for stacking in shops. From a retailer’s point of view, it looks presentable, doesn’t crush and is easier for stacking”. In addition, the team provide fitting videos and aftercare support to retailers and end users.

POINT OF DIFFERENCE
While designing things like formulas and bottles is an element of the business, it is not the only one. Williams highlights that the multicoloured triggers within the car care range are ‘unique’ selling points in themselves, whereby, each bottle has its own mechanism, designed to make application simpler for customers. He says. “We don’t just develop the product, we also develop the trigger. For example, we have developed a pre-compressed trigger which allows easier application and restricts any leaks onto fingers and hands during use”.

A similar example Bowles and Williams demonstrated was their AdBlue container. Although this formula can’t be altered, this didn’t stop the team from creating another application solution. “We can’t make AdBlue different from anybody else because it’s a standard product according to regulations”, said Williams. “However, we can differentiate the way it’s delivered. We have done this by creating a siphoned nozzle with 360° action, which can be used in different positions to fill into the car”.

PARTNERSHIP
Recently, a number of factor chains have expressed interest in the firm’s products. Williams expands. “We recently signed a deal with Euro Car Parts who are taking on the Michelin brand. They requested a couple of products including our new Screen Wash sachets and they’re also stocking Michelin’s Tyre Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS)”, adding that the firm’s wiper blades have also sparked interest. Bowles and Williams have also been in meetings with battery suppliers, factor buying groups and accessory store chains, any of whom could become potential supply partners in the near future.

The firm is now planning to extend its fleet of vans and silver range of glass, leather and wheel cleaners (to name a few) launched at Automechanika Birmingham this year. Whatever market they’re supplying, the team will continue bringing out products that will not only make sales for retailers, but more importantly, ‘make life easier’ and simpler for the end-user.

Posted in Accessories, Car Care, Cooling, Factor & Supplier News, Garage News, General, Lighting, News, Out and About with CAT, Retailer News, Styling, WipersComments (0)

DONE DEAL: SUPPLIERS SECURE LOCATIONS

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DONE DEAL: SUPPLIERS SECURE LOCATIONS


Three aftermarket firms have added to their networks.

■ Factor chain Euro Car Parts has agreed a ten-year lease for its new 20,700 sq ft warehouse, situated at the Cross Green Industrial Estate in Leeds. The location overlooks Pontefract Lane (A3), providing connections to the East Leeds Link Road and direct access to Junction 45 off the M1.

“We are pleased to have secured Euro Car Parts as a tenant for this highly prominent scheme”, said Mike Baugh, Senior Director of Industrial Agency at CBRE Leeds, “Solvgrin [the site developer] has constructed a very attractive unit at this gateway to Leeds”, adding that the organisation will construct a further 6,000 sq ft industrial unit adjacent to the supplier’s facility.

■ Tyre brand Michelin has invested £10m for its logistics operation in Stoke-on-Trent, with the opening of a new distribution centre in July. The upgrade also includes a new distribution centre for ATS Euromaster – where both units will store and deliver up to five million tyres between them per annum. The two sites combined have doubled its logistics team to around 150 staff in order to satisfy this growing demand.

Richard Whitehurst, Service to Customer Manager at Michelin Tyre, said. “The transformation of our logistics operation will allow us to improve service and ensure greater product availability”. In addition to this, the firm is stepping up manufacturing capacity at its Campbell Road headquarters in Stoke-on-Trent by launching another tyre production facility. The warehouse will open at the end of November allowing the manufacturer to produce up to 1,100 tyres a day.

■ Meanwhile,Ecobat Technologies has moved to a 15,000 sq ft premises in Bristol. “We needed to move to a property that will allow the business to continue to develop and provide support for our customers” concluded a statement from the firm.

Posted in Blogs, Factor & Supplier News, Garage News, News, Retailer News, UncategorisedComments (0)

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