Tag Archive | "Lighting"

HELLA ANNOUNCES NEW PLANT AND BUSINESS DEAL

Tags: , , , , , ,

HELLA ANNOUNCES NEW PLANT AND BUSINESS DEAL


Hella and BHAP tie the knot

AS PART OF growing demand for its vehicle lighting systems, Hella has opened a new production plant in Tianjin, China valued in low-to medium double-digit million euro.

The opening of the site follows a joint venture between Hella and Beijing Hainachuan Automotive Parts Co. Ltd. (BHAP) – a subsidiary of the BAIC Group, which will see both parties collaborate on LED headlamps, rear combination lamps, car body lighting and interior lighting under the newly formed entity, ‘Hella-BHAP’.

Markus Banner, Member of the Hella Management Board, said: “The new plant will strengthen our market position on one of the world’s major automotive markets. When extending our structures locally here on site, we are also very consciously counting on collaboration with successful Chinese partners such as BHAP. And that is because such cooperation means that we will be able to meet the needs of local customers even better than ever before.”

“Tianjin, where the new factory is located, is of strategic importance to the Chinese automotive industry as many of our key customers are located nearby”, said BHAP General Manager Chen Bao, “Hella is a perfect partner for BHAP, and we join hands to develop the automotive lighting business in this region and provide our clients with the best services and support,” adding that its cooperation will gradually expand into  electronics and aftermarket.

The new location employs100 staff with plans to extend this number to 250, along with its current site and 12,000 sq m production facility in due course.

 

Posted in Blogs, Factor & Supplier News, Garage News, Lighting, News, Retailer News, UncategorisedComments (0)

HELLA MAKES GROUND-BREAKING DEVELOPMENT

Tags: , , ,

HELLA MAKES GROUND-BREAKING DEVELOPMENT


PROMOTION ARTICLE ON BEHALF OF HELLA

As a respected original equipment (OE) manufacturer and systems supplier, HELLA is already at the forefront of automotive technology with its involvement in areas such as ADAS (advance driver assistance systems) and LED lighting solutions. However, unwilling to sit on its laurels, the company is now looking further into the future to redefine the limits of present and future camera evolution.

So, as well as current ADAS innovations like lane departure warning systems, which are based on radar sensors that constantly monitor the area behind the car when passing other vehicles or changing lanes, HELLA is developing products that continue to enhance its reputation as a leader in the market.

Working alongside independent associated business Brighter AI, HELLA has been increasing the quality of existing camera systems by pushing the boundaries of technology with a cloud-based application that has allowed the development of new safety and comfort-related functions.

The solution has already been implemented in the security sector, but can be adapted for automotive applications and uses infrared night photography to create realistic daylight images.

In layman terms, the team is developing the technology that will enable the driver to look into the rearview mirror at night and the view reflected will appear to them as if they were driving in daylight, thus solving a basic problem of driving in the dark – limited sight and slower reaction times.

Greater illumination of the area around them will significantly increase driver safety as they will be able to see more of the road behind, leading to less accidents and potential fatalities.

Currently in its pilot stages, HELLA is confident that the realistic colour image technology will pave the way for further uses in the industry such as optimising camera-based driver assistance systems, as well as applications in aviation and aerospace.

For more information about the OE quality products available from HELLA or for Behr Hella Service, please call customer services on: 01295 662400 or email hella.sales@hella.com

Posted in Featured Sidebar, Industry InsightComments (0)

SPOT-ON TESTING

Tags: , , , ,

SPOT-ON TESTING


One halogen bulb might look similar to another, but is there a real difference? We took a trip to Aachen to find out

Bulbs are checked at each stage of production

Anyone who has served time behind the counter of an accessory shop will tell you that bulbs will be a year-round staple of what they sell. Perhaps less clear to the vendors is the difference between them. There is a headlight bulb for every price point, with some halogen bulbs ranging between a couple of pounds up to around £30 for a top rated product.

However, the amount of light output from all bulbs has to be within a tolerance band of a certain percentage of each other, so how different can the bulbs be? We took a trip to Lumileds in Aachen, Germany to find out.

On our visit we met with Richard Armstrong, UK Country Manager for Philips Automotive and Juergen Melzer, a Consultant Engineer working for the firm.

One of the first things to address is the issue of ECE conformity markings. All headlamp bulbs sold in the UK and across Europe must conform and display the mark. “If the product doesn’t meet the standard, then the it must not be used” Melzer explained. “To get the product approved the maker needs to bring five samples to a test house to get the certificate for the conformity number from the authorities. If you own a factory, you need to declare that the product conforms”. Herein lies the problem, some suppliers, and even some well-known brands simply buy the product from various sources and the conformity, known as Regulation 37, is lost. One magazine test a couple of years back even found that a ‘matched pair’ of bulbs in a packet had been made by different producers.

TESTING
However, very little in bulb testing is subjective – and such discrepancies can be uncovered certainly in terms of testing the output and beam pattern of a halogen bulb is straightforward if you have access to the right equipment, and in this case the ‘right equipment’ is a light tunnel, more correctly called a goniophotometer, which reads the spatial distribution of light.

To demonstrate, the team show us into an internal room that is windowless by necessity. The room features a bank of headlamp clusters from different vehicles, aimed at a number of reference points over the on the far wall. “The standards specify a beam with a sharp, asymmetric cut off preventing significant amounts of light from being cast into the eyes of drivers of preceding or oncoming cars” explained Richard Armstrong. We then have a demo of Philips’ brand and known competitor bulbs, both halogen and Xenon. The meters clearly show that while the various products differ in the amounts of light produced and the colour of the light, the essential requirements of the beam and cutoff points are similar.

However, this isn’t the case when we are shown the results of some spurious bulbs. Although they bear the E-mark it was immediately obvious that the first we are shown (an H7) would be likely to dazzle a driver coming from the other direction as there was no clearly defined cut off. Apart from being a safety problem, such a headlamp would certainly fail an MOT.

A set of Xenon bulbs were similarly off-pattern, and such was the intensity of the beam that they were similarly likely to dazzle oncoming traffic.

While we are there, the team showed as an ‘explosion test’, which is just as alarming as it sounds. A pair of bulbs are switched on in a blastproof box. One is the Philips product and one is a competitor product. While the bulbs are still hot, cold water is sprayed on them. The competitor product shatters immediately, but the Philips- branded product remains intact, thanks to the properties of the quartz glass.

HIGH OUTPUT
An interesting point is the popularity of bulbs that offer increased output. These are upgrades keenly purchased by car enthusiasts and command a healthy premium over standard bulbs, which makes them popular for the retailer as well. However, some customers might not be aware that increased performance will result in a shorter life. “Sometimes the consumer doesn’t understand (that it has a shorter life) and sometimes the consumer believes that the product will have an all- round better performance, including a longer lifetime. If I could manage this, I’d be rich and wouldn’t need to work anymore” noted Melzer wryly.

He adds that such a product is referred to in Germany as an “Eierlegende Wollmilchsau” which literally means an animal that can lay eggs as well as produce milk and wool and is obviously impossible.

“We need to explain to people that if you bring more light to the road that the product will have a shorter lifetime. We can explain what we are doing to compensate this” said Melzer, saying that a number of points can further reduce the lifespan of a bulb. One is that some vehicles that have a voltage output 0.5v more than specified.

He adds that it is also important to identify what the customer wants from their bulb. If the motorist owns one of those Renaults that seem to require keyhole surgery to replace a lamp and it is driven mostly in town, then Melzer remarked that a product such as the long- life Eco Vision might be the most suitable. “You need to think about the bulb you’d reccomend that fits their needs. Of course, Racing Vision will give them more light, but I wouldn’t want to recommend a bulb that they wouldn’t be happy with. So it isn’t black and white” he said.

Final visual check

We round off our visit with a tour of the on-site production facilities. We visited the production line of an H7 bulb and saw the entire process from taking glass tubes (which are also produced locally using quartz crystal) through to the finished product, Along every sep of the production process, the components are tested, with around 20 production checks in total. This is completed with a final electronic test with a computer recording performance to ensure consistency, as well as a further visual inspection by a team of operators each equipped with a jeweler’s magnifying glass.

So to answer our original question, it seems that while one bulb will look much like another, the difference in performance can be very great indeed – and a good point to explain to customers who want to know the difference between one product and another.

Structure of the company

The current structure of the company that produces Philips automotive lighting needs some explaining.

Back in 2005, Philips took control of Lumileds. a San Jose- based producer of LEDs following previous joint ventures.

Ten years later, Philips took a decision to focus on its healthcare business, so it sold the LED and automotive lighting business and the newco would be called Lumileds and would continue to produce Philips-brand products under licence.

A deal struck with private equity firm Apollo Global Management, confirmed on July 7 of this year, saw the former take 79.9 percent of shares in Lumileds, while Philips retain the remainder.

Nonetheless, the products are made in the same factory as always and the only visible is the Lumileds sign above the gate.

Posted in CAT Features, Factor & Supplier News, Garage News, Lighting, News, Retailer NewsComments (0)

Advertisement
  • Huge takeovers, plus connected everything. What’s the future for the aftermarket?
  • All about the brakes: How brake brands plan to keep you custom
  • New tools and toys to kick-start your New Year

more info

    • Sorry, there are no polls available at the moment.
    • Popular
    • Latest
    • Comments
    • Tags
    • Subscribe